If You Have “Time to Spare,” You’re Doing it Wrong

51: Save Music in the Music City!

|
Listen to this episode
Powered by the Simple Podcast Press Player

Time to Spare?

cheesy-smileRecently, a friend of mine and I were talking about an idea he had for a book.

My friend is a music professor at a local university. His idea was to write a book of warm-ups for brass players based on music theory.

As he described the idea, I could sense a clear passion for this idea. And it was a good idea, one that would be of interest to a lot of people provided it was written and marketed intelligently.

But there was one problem. He said something along the lines of, "Yeah, I'll write it with all that spare time I have."

Now, to be clear, my friend is very busy. In addition to his responsibilities at the university he works for, he's an active freelance player in the local town and keeps a full studio of students.

And I'm not writing this blog post because I'm trying to convince him to act on his idea.

It just that it seems like lack of time - or the perception thereof - is a huge deterrent to a lot of musicians from acting on the entrepreneurial idea they have. (And I believe just about everyone has some sort of business idea. They just lack the guidance and knowledge on how to make it happen. Hence this blog and podcast, but I digress.)

 

rolling eyesWhen my friend told me his idea, followed by the reason (or excuse?) he wasn't able to pursue it, I immediately knew it was a matter of priorities.

He had time to sit in his backyard with me, drink a beer and share his idea - but he doesn't have time to actually do it.

And I found out a few weeks later that he takes on an extra 10 students per month so he can pay the insurance and payment on a really nice BMW SUV.

(Shame, Shame, I know Your Name)

The Solution

What if every hour of your day was accounted for?

Financial gurus like Dave Ramsey talk about this with money. It makes just as much sense to apply it to our time.

What if my friend, as busy as he is, devoted 30 minutes per week to his book project? How long do you think it would take before it's done? Maybe a year.

Maybe he would realize that it's not as difficult as he first thought to carve out time for the project and he's able to devote an hour per week.

Maybe he gets on a roll and tells me, sorry, he can't meet for a beer because he's this close to finishing his book and can't be interrupted.

Now, when I say "budget your time," I'm not talking about having every single minute of every single day accounted for.

That's psychotic and unreasonable.

What I'm talking about is more in terms of hours than minutes and seconds.


rock star

Let's say you work at a job for 8 hours, you have a 30 minute drive to and from work, then you have responsibilities at home. Feed the kids, shower the kids, put the kids to bed, etc.

Then you know you have 2 hours before you pass out and can't do anything else.

A lot of people would think they need to "decompress" by watching the boob tube.

Not so with those who have set goals and budget their time wisely.

You may take an hour to watch TV, but it's for a purpose: so you can let your mind wander before focusing on your book, or blog, or whatever.

So, you have two hours. Identify a few things that you're going to get done in that amount of time.

That is so much better than having a list of 30 things that "need" to get done and you "only" have 2 hours in which to do it.

That's exasperating. It will burn you out before you can even get into a groove.

Remember: You're not "spending" two hours on your project. You're investing that time into your project - which we hope will eventually become your business that allows you to quit that job that you don't really care for anyways 🙂

None of this will be easy, mind you. But with some planning, a bit of sacrifice and that nefarious practice called DISCIPLINE, it is more than doable.

Oh, and you'll also need accountability.

mpdot communitySo join the MusicPreneur.Community today. I'll keep you on task 🙂

Leave a Comment





×
When Making it Happen as a MusicPreneur
Community is Key